All recipes are for 2 servings unless noted. Oil is canola oil and salt is kosher salt.

2014-09-06

Ebi to kyuri no itamemono / stir-fried shrimp and Japanese cucumber

Tasty and light. The plump shrimp in this quick stir-fry are a big plus. Great as part of a meal and bento, or with drinks. Cook cucumber on high heat for a crispy finish!


102 calories (1/2 of recipe); 10.7 g protein; 3.3 g fat; 6.3 g carbohydrate; 5.5 g net carbs; 188 mg sodium (when using shoyukoji made of 50% reduced-sodium soy sauce); 78 mg cholesterol; 0.8 g fiber


<Ingredients>
6 shrimp (170 g in shell in photo)
2-3 tsp katakuriko potato starch (to clean shrimp; not in photo)
1 tbsp katakuriko potato starch (to coat shrimp)
1 kyuri Japanese cucumber
1 knob ginger

1 tsp canola oil (not in photo)

For seasoning
1/4 tsp kurozu brown rice vinegar
1/2 tbsp shoyukoji soy sauce rice malt
1/4 tsp oyster sauce
1 tsp Shaoxing wine
1/2 tsp sesame oil (not in photo)


<Directions>
1.

Shell shrimp, and clean with katakuriko potato starch. Rinse, and drain well.

2.
Bring plenty of water to boil for shrimp.


3.

Meanwhile, cut cucumber lengthwise in half, and slice diagonally into 3-4 mm thick.
Julienne ginger. 

4.

Mix shoyukoji, oyster sauce and Shaoxing wine.

5.

When water boils, coat shrimp with katakuriko, and blanch.

When turning pinkish, remove, and drain well. 


6.

In a frying pan, heat canola oil, and stir-fry cucumber on high heat.

When cucumber starts to look brighter, add ginger and kurozu vinegar, and continue frying for another minute.


7.

Add shrimp, and mix.
Pour shoyukoji mixture, and mix well.
Put sesame oil, and mix well.
Ready to serve.   

<Notes>
  • No Japanese cucumber? Try English cucumber. If you do, remove seeds (cut out inner part) to prevent a soggy outcome.
  • If shoyukoji is not at hand, soy sauce works. Sodium content above would be 231 mg with 50% reduced-sodium soy sauce, and 348 mg with regular soy sauce.
  • If kurozu brown rice vinegar is not available, use regular rice vinegar.
  • Sake can substitute for Shaoxing wine. Both Shaoxing wine and kurozu add a deeper, more complex taste and aroma, whereas regular rice vinegar and sake lighten this dish.
     

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